Posted tagged ‘Yaskawa VFD’

Yaskawa Introduces New High Efficiency Drive

July 14, 2015

Yaskawa has introduced the U1000 Industrial Matrix Drive, it’s most efficient drive ever. The U1000 is second to none when it comes to power quality and energy savings.  Enjoy extremely low harmonic distortion and regeneration in a compact design without the need for additional components. Unlike conventional drives, Yaskawa’s matrix technology creates a variable output by switching directly from the input power (no DC bus). Make measurable efficiency gains while experiencing the outstanding performance of a Yaskawa industrial drive.

Yaskawa U1000 Industrial Matrix Drive

 

For a quote or more information about the new Yaskawa U1000 Industrial Matrix Drive, contact Innovative-IDM at 877.906.2100 or email us at info@iidm.com.

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7 Things to Know When Choosing an Industrial AC Drive

June 10, 2015

Seven Things To Know When Choosing An AC DriveWhich industrial AC drive should I use? Picking the correct features of a Variable Frequency Drive for your particular application can leave you scratching your head. Here are 7 things to know and should consider when picking the right AC drive for your need.

1. Know the AC drive’s electrical current limit
Your industrial AC drive supplies current to your motor and shut it on and off. Every time your motor shuts off and on, current will spike in your AC drive. Knowing your AC drive’s electrical current limit will ensure that the motor doesn’t burn itself or the AC drive out. It can also let your AC drive shut the motor off in the event the motor begins to draw too much current.
2. Find the motor’s name plate information
The motor your AC drive operates will have a plate of information on it giving you the specs it needs an AC drive to have. Information like horsepower, torque, current draw and etc., are all displayed on the motor so it’s important to match the AC drive to the motor, not the overall system itself.
3. Know your motor’s duty cycle
The AC drive you choose will need to account for the duty cycle of its motor. If the motor is running nonstop or for extended periods of time, it will generate heat and begin to operate less efficiently or even burn up as a result. Picking the right AC drive with the right programming allows it to monitor the motor’s condition and mitigate the productive losses to a minimum.
4. Know what your industrial AC drive communicates with.
Your AC drive needs to chat with other buddies besides the motor. As part of a larger, complete system, your AC drive may need to communicate with a Data Collection System (DCS) or Controlling System. These systems can PC-Based or controlled automatically by a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC). Knowing your systems communication protocol allows you to choose an AC drive with the same or even multiple communication protocols.
5. Know your AC drive’s control method.
Your AC drive can be controlled using a variety of different methods. Depending on whether it will be a local, analog or digital control method, the AC drive will need to be set up differently. Each method requires different wiring and ports, so knowing this beforehand will make selecting an industrial AC drive easier.
6. Know the environmental conditions.
An AC drive will likely operate under less-than-perfect conditions. Take into account how dusty its operating environment will be. How hot will it get? Is there moisture? Industrial AC drives can come built with an Ingress Protection rating, which will give it varying degrees of resistance to adverse conditions. You could also choose a housing cabinet that will protect a standard AC drive.
7. Know your available power.
Knowing what kind of electrical supply you already have will let you select the right industrial AC drive. For example, if you’re using a 120 volt wall outlet, you can select an AC drive that’s capable of operating on that power supply. If it’s more, pick a higher volt AC drive. If it’s lower, pick a lower volt AC drive. — Troy Hardy, Field Application Engineer

4 Ways to Reduce VFD Downtime

April 15, 2015

Variable frequency drives are probably one of the greatest inventions in modern automation.  If you aren’t using one of these things yet, trust me you will be soon.  They are always getting less expensive, easier to use, the applications are virtually endless.  Now you can control the speed and the direction of the motor and save money at the same time.  These things are instrumental in a lot of different applications and therefore, their uptime is critical.  As you may know if you ever had to replace one before, it could be a little cumbersome to replace.  It’s always really a race against the clock, because it almost certainly means a motor somewhere is not running which is probably meaning some downtime for you.

So the first thing you always want to remember about VFD uptime is that heat is the number one VFD killer, or heat is the number 1 killer for any piece of electronics for that matter, especially VFDs.  These components you have to remember have high voltage running through them, so it could be 480-600 volts if you are in the Canada market running through them and they produce a lot of heat.  There are fans inside these things that are designed to cool them.  They also have massive heat syncs on the back that are used for heat transfer to the cabinet or surrounding pieces to keep them cool.  The one thing you always have to remember is you need to let your VFDs breathe.  They have to stay cool.  Keep the fans running, always keep the fans running.  The first thing that you are probably going to see that will fail on a VFD is the fan, because it’s always running.  Anytime the VFD is on, the fans are running constantly.  So you need to make sure you have spare fans on the shelf, you know how to replace them, and you maintain them.  Make them part of your preventative maintenance program.  Check and make sure they are running. Also, the heat syncs themselves can get very dusty, and that dust can build up a lot of that heat so that it can’t transfer heat properly and they will get too hot.  Always clean your heat syncs.

1. There are fans forcing air through the internals. Dust can build up just like a PC at home.  What do you do to mitigate that?  You get a can of compressed air and blow that stuff out of there every now and then.  Make sure that you keep a VFD cool and it will always be happy.

2. You want to protect your drafts from heat and contaminants, such as dust or particulate that may be in your air because of whatever process is going on in the nearby environment. You want to make sure the cabinet that these are installed in or at least the environment of the room they are in is a controlled environment.  Make sure it’s not going to get too hot.  If you are going to put it in a cabinet make sure the Nema or the IP rating of the cabinet is suitable for that environment to keep the contaminants from getting to this piece of equipment.

3. You always want to use proper electrical filters whenever possible. There are filters that are designed for use of both line side, which is between the power company and the drive, and load side, which is between the drive and the motor or the load.  There are inductive and compassitive type filters as well as RFIEMI type filters that are designed to help these things, help protect these things from power spikes, electromagnetic noise that may damage the input or output side of the drive or electronics.  So always try to use proper electrical filters.  It may cost you a little more in the beginning but you will be a lot better off in the long run because it will prolong the life of the VFD itself.

4. You always want to properly maintain the load that this motor is connected to. For instance, if you are not properly maintaining a motor and the motor burns up and the insulation melts inside the motor because it gets too hot, maybe because you didn’t grease a barring.  It could cause a short.  A short is going to damage the output of this drive and could cause the drive itself to fail.  So make sure you are always properly maintaining downstream equipment, the load that the drive is hooked up to.

If you have any more questions about this always feel free to contact us.  We have application specialists that can help answer questions as far as how to properly size them, how to properly size the cabinets that they are installed in, the environments they go in, as well as the electrical filters I mentioned, best practices to use when installing those.  You can also find a lot of information on our website innovativeidm.com.  This is where you will find our knowledge center.  There is going to be white papers best practices listed there that you would want to use when selecting drives and components both upstream and downstream from the drive to help increase uptime.  After all Innovative-IDM is Home of the Legendary Customer Experience.

Yaskawa F7 Interesting Problem I’ve Never Seen

February 6, 2015

As one of Innovative-IDM’s Houston-area field service technicians, I was called out to look at a lathe.

The customer complained that the lube pump wasn’t working. It actually was. But we started the machine and ramped it up, it sounded like the gears were going to grind out of the machine and the DB resistors started smoking. The customer indicated it was probably normal, due to low load and gear selection…I took the opposite view (there is something seriously wrong here) and convinced him to pull the belts. The motor continued to cog (and the DB started to smoke again) at about 1/4 speed even uncoupled.

The motor megged and ohmed normal.

The Yaskawa F7 4045 drive was running in Open loop vector.

I disconnected the DB Unit (it statically checked fine). The cogging continued and the drive OV tripped.

I saved the parameters and switched the drive to V/Hz. The cogging decreased dramatically (however the machine still started to vibrate. No OV trip.) The output waveform looked fairly normal phase to phase, and normal phase to+/- busses.

At about 15hz the DC buss started to get a 100VAC sign wave riding on top of it at ~ 11Hz and linearly increased to 12Hz as the drive was speed up to 20hz, above that the ripple disappeared. The machine vibration also followed starting at 15Hz and disappearing at 20 Hz.

I broke out my Fluke Scope current clamp on, and found the output current waveform to be a normal sine wave below 15hz and above 20Hz.

Between 15 and 20Hz however the Current waveform (on all 3 legs) appears to be the summation of 2 similarly sized ac waveforms.

I discussing the situation with one of our engineers, Steve Lyons, and he suggested that the issue could be the result of the motors rotor wobbling, changing the air gap.

I informed the customer that I’m leaning towards a motor issue ~ 85/15 and that the only way to be certain is to hook up the drive to a test motor.

We will do so at a later date as the customer will bring out his spare motor while he fixes the gearing (he found several issues during a visual inspection preformed while I was dinking with the drive). The machine will be down for a month or so.

I have included a pdf of the “Normal” current waveform VS the “Distorted” current waveform.

I’ve never seen this before … if any one has any ideas I’m open for suggestions, experiences, anecdotes…what ever you’ve got.  – DF

Yaskawa V7 data

Yaskawa V7 Trouble Shooting Data

Yaskawa Roadshow Training in San Antonio February 2015

January 26, 2015

The Yaskawa Drives Roadshow is coming to San Antonio in February for A1000 training. Call us at 877.906.2100 or send us an email at marketing@iidm.com to reserve your seat today!

Yaskawa A1000 Training San Antonio
February 20, 2015
8:30 – 4pm (lunch included)
$249 per seat

This will be hands-on programming training on the A1000 drive. All drives, motors, equipment is provided.  To see where the Yaskawa Drives Roadshow will be going next, check out our training page at innovativeidm.com/training.

Yaskawa A1000 training San Antonio February 2015

Top 5 reasons Allen-Bradley May not be your best application solution

January 20, 2015

Be sure to visit our knowledge Center – http://www.innovativeidm.com/Resources.aspx

Innovative IDM
1625 Wallace Drive, Ste. 110
Carrollton, Texas 75006
Call: 877-906-2100

Hi my name is Jack Marsh with Innovative IDM. Today I’d like to talk a little bit about Allen Bradley and maybe perhaps why it’s not always the best solution for your application. Allen Bradley makes fine products, and they are quality products, and they’ve got a very broad offering, but they are not always the perfect solution for every application. We’ve really identified, 5 reasons why that’s the case.

Alan Bradley has a very successful top down marketing approach, and convinced large end users in specific market segments, to standardize on their products. And then those end users can dictate to the machine builders that they go to, that Allen Bradley is the products that’s going to be used in their machines, but that allows Allen Bradley to charge more for their hardware and software. They don’t have to be competitive with the market if their users are dictating their products are going to be used in the machines. There’s also the support cost. If you don’t have a service agreement, or a purchase order, or a credit card, handy when you call Allen Bradley for factory support you’re going to be out of luck. So you better have those things in mind when you call to get support from them

Then all of their software sold on an alacart basis, so say for example you purchase the PLC programming software then say later on down the road you find that you need to configure some network communications, or perhaps you want to simulate the PLC and HMI interactions without having the hardware present. Well that network communication suit is an additional product you’re going to have to purchase, the simulation package is an additional product you’re going to have to purchase. Wherein a lot of other manufactures those functions are built into the software you buy for the programming.

Another thing Alan Bradley does that allows them to offer a very broad product line without incurring high development cost is to private label products from other manufactures, but the downside of that is there is not a consistent look and feel across the product line. So a small ac drive for example may program and configure completely differently than the large variable frequency drives from Allan Bradley. And if one of the manufacturers there private labeling from happens to have a discontinuation or product change there are ramifications for Allen Bradley products that are beyond their control, there might not be a simple replacement for that.

And then the last thing to consider is the international support. While Allen Bradley has a very large market share in the US their presence in Europe and Asia is not nearly as large so if you’re building machines for the overseas market and you’re going to need support after it’s installed that might be an issue.

If you’d line to research some of the options to Allen Bradley such as Omron, Yaskawa, Parker, or Wago, please visit our website at innovativeidm.com and remember Innovative IDM is the home of the legendary customer experience.

5 Most Common Reasons An AC Drive Ends Up Needing Repair

January 13, 2015

Be sure to visit our knowledge Center – http://www.innovativeidm.com/Resources.aspx

Innovative IDM
1625 Wallace Drive, Ste. 110
Carrollton, Texas 75006
Call: 877-906-2100

Hi I’m Lonnie Muse with Innovative IDM. Gonna talk a little bit about AC drives this morning. These things are wonderful, they have come into being and lasted a long time and there’s a real great need for them in our plants, but they are put into some places that have difficult environments. So I wanna kinda talk about the AC drive Failures.
Maybe have it medicated a little bit and what causes is. The biggest cause is not the product itself but the things that surround it. Heat is the biggest issue. It does produce a little bit of heat. It adds to the environment around it the ambient temperature. All the other products in that panel that are creating heat add to the source, if we don’t get that heat out of there or cool it down overtime this will die. Especially if it’s a dusty environment or other airborne things that are attracted to the fans in the back of the drive and aren’t cleaned out. Or the motor, I’m sorry the fan of the AC drive stops, not pulling the air through.
The biggest thing is heat we need to mitigate that. The next thing is power spikes that come through. Whether it’s caused by machines upstream or where there’s cause by lighting, or the power company, or somebody hitting a power pole outside, power spikes can kill these drives really quickly. So we need to have steps, to take steps to eliminate some of that or at least reduce it. One of the steps could be a reactor put in front of the drive that will help keep from the power spikes coming in and damaging the drive.
Another area where our drive fails is because of the other end it’s attached to the motor. If the motors not taken care of, If it’s not maintenance, if the bearings aren’t greased. There are issues that a motor, and this is related to heat as well, can short out. And if it shorts normally it’s gonna take the drive as well. It’s gonna short internally, draw too much current and will damage the drive. Check the motors.
The last, the next one I guess is age. The mean time between failures for these typical drives here is 28 years. But I guarantee you if you don’t do things ahead of time and keep it working when it gets to 10 years, 15 years, 20 years. We’re gonna start having failure. Can you imagine 20 years old and still running, some of us don’t drive cars that old. So age can affect things. Things deteriorate, change overtime, and eventually there’s failure.
The largest one and usually it happens on the front end when a drive is being installed is it’s installed incorrectly. What I have seen in my experience customers put the input power on the power leads of the drive which just tears it up. It fails. They have 24 volts for the inputs and the outputs and it puts 110 on it. So sometimes it’s installation driven. Not the product itself just improper installation.
If you’d like to know more about this come see us at http://www.innovativeidm.com we’ve got white papers, we’ve got products, we’ve got technical expertise that can help. After all were the home of legendary customer experience.
5 Most Common Reasons An AC Drive Ends Up Needing Repair