Posted tagged ‘sensors’

How to Choose a Photoelectric Sensor

June 23, 2015

Photoelectric sensors may seem rudimentary to a lot of people out there especially if you’re a seasoned vet. If you’re a new guy it may seem a little daunting since there’s so many different options, so many different shapes, sizes, options available, and boy if you pick the wrong one you’ll know it quick. It can definitely be the difference between being a stable logic program that depends on that sensor to make decisions, and also just the stability of the throughput on the line. So you really want to make sure you pick the right photo electric sensor, and it’s not rocket science as there’s really 3 basic types of photoelectric sensors.

The first type is a through beam sensor, which is basically an emitter and a receiver that just look right at each other. So, if you break the beam there’s an output, or there may be an output whenever the beams see each other. That’s one way to look at it.

There’s also what’s called retroflective and that’ll be where you use a reflector and a sensor. The sensor basically sees its light source bounce off the reflector and come back to the receiver that’s in the same housing.

The third type is diffuse reflective which requires no sensor so the light will bounce off the object and come back into the receiver itself.

The differences between the three typically are gonna affect your sensing distance and also it can really hinge on the reflectivity of the object that you are trying to sense. So really you just need to take a look at your application, the mounting location of the sensor, how far away you can be or how close you can be to the object your trying to sense. Those factors can really help determine which one of those 3 are going to be the best for you.

There are different light sources inside of the sensor and that can affect the sensing distance. It can also affect the stability of the signal, and also in certain environments where there can also be contaminants in the air or light pollution, external light pollution that affects the receiver, you might need a different light source to mitigate some of those. Your typical light sources that you’re going to find in today’s market are gonna be LED lights, infrared lights, laser lights, and every now and then you’ll run into an application that calls for an ultraviolet light inside of a sensor. And again that’s just gonna affect the sensing distance, the stability, things of that nature.

Really the number one thing I can recommend when trying to find a sensor and make sure that it’s right is to get a sample and test it, and retest it, and test it with different types of sensors and different types of environments. Always remember to test for the extreme. Don’t test under normal operating conditions because if one day it’s cloudy out or one day the sun is right in your eyes, if you didn’t test for that, if you were just testing for the normal operating environments you’re gonna get an unstable signal. So always test for the worst case scenario, the extremes are what you really want to look for. Another good rule of thumb if you can, is to try to use models with quick disconnects on the back. That’s a major plus for your maintenance staff whenever you need the ability to change a sensor quickly without having to replace the entire wire all the way back to the cabinet it’s wired into –  that’s why they designed these. And most sensor manufacturers are going to give you the option to either have a flying lead coming out of the sensor or on the back end of it you’ll have a little M12 or M8 through your 4 pin quick disconnect that this can just hook right into.

And so like I said it’s not rocket science, just make sure that you test. I can’t stress enough how many times people think that they know that a sensor will work in an application, they never tested it, and then we get a call saying they need to return the model for a different one because for some reason it didn’t work for one reason or another that would have been easy to test. Omron even manufactures a checker, which is basically a DC power supply that you can wire a sensor into with a little light output that tells you when the output of a sensor turns on. You can even turn on a little buzzer so it’s really handy to be able to hook up a sensor, go out on your line and just start testing stuff and see when you get your output and make sure its stable.

If you have any questions, you need help with this, there’s always new sensors coming out, all kinds of new technology that makes them more powerful, gives them extended range, and that’s something Innovative-IDM can really help you with because it’s our job to know that kind of stuff and to be able to help you with any applications that come up. We also have a sensor specialist we can bring in if necessary, you can also find a lot of this information on our website which is innovativeidm.com. Go to our Knowledge Center, where you can find white papers for our different types of sensor applications and best practices. After all we are Home of the Legendary Customer Experience.

Omron Introduces New E2B Proximity Sensors

July 26, 2013

Cylindrical-body inductive proximity sensors in the new E2B range have been specifically developed to offer a cost-effective sensing solution in standard industrial conditions, making it unnecessary to pay more for sensors that provide features that are not needed. E2B sensors are manufactured using our innovative “hot-melt” production process, which allows them to offer exceptional value for money with no compromise in quality, performance or reliability.

Omron E2B Proximity Sensor

 

Order your Standard Environment E2B Proximity Sensors today from Innovative-IDM.  Call us at 877.906.2100 or send us an email at info@iidm.com

 

Omron ZG2 Measurement Sensor

June 17, 2013

Omron ZG2 Measurement Sensor

The ZG2 enables precise shape measurement on challenging materials and surfaces. An easy and intuitive user interface enables efficient installation, setup and operation. A built-in LCD monitor indicates the measurement result in real time.

  • Easy-to-use – intuitive user interface
  • Live – built-in LCD monitor for setup and immediate profile display
  • Versatile – 18 measurement tools
  • Accurate – 5 µm resolution (3 mm / 631 pixels)
  • Wide profiles – up to 70 mm

For more information or to order your Omron ZG2 Measurement Sensor contact Innovative-IDM at info@iidm.com or give us a call at 877.906.2100.

High Resolution Smart Sensor FQ2 Extends Functionality

October 23, 2012

Omron Automation and Safety expands the FQ Smart Vision Sensor series with a faster processor (600 MHz) and built-in EtherNet/IP that provide an easy-to integrate inspection tool for picking, alignment or quality inspections.

Omron FQ2 Smart Sensor
What’s New

  • S3 High Resolution Models Extend Functionality to easily perform inspection and positioning
    • 9 inspection items to choose from
    • Adjustable shutter speed
    • Partial input (Horizontal and vertical)
    • Up to 32 simultaneous measurements
  • Diverse Line-up that fits a wide range of applications
    • “C” Mount type available
    • Color and Monochrome cameras
    • High Resolution of 0.88 Mpix and 1.3 Mpix
    • Expandable I/O up to 11 inputs and 24 outputs
    • EtherNet/IP, FINS, PLC Link or RS-232C Communications
  • Ratings
    • IP67

 

Customize Omron Sensors with Factory Molded Connectors

December 15, 2011

Beginning this week, we can now offer our customer factory molded connectors onto their OMRON sensors. We can add a molded IP67-rated M8 or M12 Connector and custom-length cable onto most Omron 3-wire and 4-wire DC Photoelectric or Proximity
Sensors.

This new program from OMRON lets our customers have a choice of affordable custom sensors with their choice of straight connector type. Ordering custom connectors is  simple
1. Call Innovative-IDM at 877.906.2100 or go to http://www.innovativeidm.com
2. Relax, we’ll take care of the rest.

Robotic Donkey Climbs 35 Degrees, Carries 300 Pounds

July 25, 2008

The video of this beast almost is scary.  A fully automated donkey that can’t be kicked over, walks in snow, scales hills and packs 300+ pounds of payload.

The donkey’s control system keeps it balanced, steers, navigates, and regulates energetics as conditions vary. Sensors for locomotion include joint position, joint force, ground contact, ground load, a laser gyroscope, and a stereo vision system.

Other sensors focus on the internal state of BigDog, monitoring the hydraulic pressure, oil temperature, engine temperature, rpm, battery charge and others.

Can you imagine 1,000 of these working in a military convoy?