Posted tagged ‘industrial field service’

Yaskawa F7 Interesting Problem I’ve Never Seen

February 6, 2015

As one of Innovative-IDM’s Houston-area field service technicians, I was called out to look at a lathe.

The customer complained that the lube pump wasn’t working. It actually was. But we started the machine and ramped it up, it sounded like the gears were going to grind out of the machine and the DB resistors started smoking. The customer indicated it was probably normal, due to low load and gear selection…I took the opposite view (there is something seriously wrong here) and convinced him to pull the belts. The motor continued to cog (and the DB started to smoke again) at about 1/4 speed even uncoupled.

The motor megged and ohmed normal.

The Yaskawa F7 4045 drive was running in Open loop vector.

I disconnected the DB Unit (it statically checked fine). The cogging continued and the drive OV tripped.

I saved the parameters and switched the drive to V/Hz. The cogging decreased dramatically (however the machine still started to vibrate. No OV trip.) The output waveform looked fairly normal phase to phase, and normal phase to+/- busses.

At about 15hz the DC buss started to get a 100VAC sign wave riding on top of it at ~ 11Hz and linearly increased to 12Hz as the drive was speed up to 20hz, above that the ripple disappeared. The machine vibration also followed starting at 15Hz and disappearing at 20 Hz.

I broke out my Fluke Scope current clamp on, and found the output current waveform to be a normal sine wave below 15hz and above 20Hz.

Between 15 and 20Hz however the Current waveform (on all 3 legs) appears to be the summation of 2 similarly sized ac waveforms.

I discussing the situation with one of our engineers, Steve Lyons, and he suggested that the issue could be the result of the motors rotor wobbling, changing the air gap.

I informed the customer that I’m leaning towards a motor issue ~ 85/15 and that the only way to be certain is to hook up the drive to a test motor.

We will do so at a later date as the customer will bring out his spare motor while he fixes the gearing (he found several issues during a visual inspection preformed while I was dinking with the drive). The machine will be down for a month or so.

I have included a pdf of the “Normal” current waveform VS the “Distorted” current waveform.

I’ve never seen this before … if any one has any ideas I’m open for suggestions, experiences, anecdotes…what ever you’ve got.  – DF

Yaskawa V7 data

Yaskawa V7 Trouble Shooting Data

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Industrial Electronics How To Tell Whether To Repair Or Replace

December 16, 2014

Be sure to visit our knowledge Center – http://www.innovativeidm.com/Resources.aspx

Innovative IDM
1625 Wallace Drive, Ste. 110
Carrollton, Texas 75006
Call: 877-906-2100

Hi, I’m Jeff Rodgers with Innovative IDM. You know, a true dichotomy really does exist between the age old question of should I repair my electronic component or just throw it out and replace it with a new one. Well first thing is, if you have an electronic component go down, we all know that time costs money. So, priority number one is get back up and running. If it’s that critical of a component, hopefully you’ve got a spare on the shelf to replace it with. If not, you probably have bigger problems than just that question. So let’s say you replace the component with your spare that’s on the shelf and now you’ve got a bad component. Well should you just toss it, or should you have it validated for repair?

Well, the one thing you might want to consider is, if you are going to have it evaluated for repair you want to make sure that that piece of equipment goes to a reputable firm that’s done it for a long time, offers you a warranty on that product, and is not going to just repair it but really refurbish that piece of equipment. You want to make sure that when it comes back, one component that was fixed can’t allow another component to fail right afterwards. So all the wear components really need to have been replaced. Now a good rule of thumb is that you probably want to make sure it’s not going to cost you over half the price of a new piece of equipment or it may not really be worth it. So just kinda really keep that in mind.

So real common components that you could have evaluated for repair are going to be variable frequency drives, touch screen HMIs are another big one that can be a failure point and can prove to be pretty expensive to buy new. IO cards, processors, temperature controllers, any kind of controllers in general, motion controllers, process controllers, all of the above.

So, another thing you really ought to think about is you know when it comes to cost, not just what its gonna cost to repair the component but if you did need to replace the component, is that component obsolete, is it even made anymore? So if it’s not made anymore, then if you need to replace that piece of equipment and you have to go to something new, now you’ve got to think about cost in terms of time and resources needed to make that work with all the equipment. Is there going to be any new programming that is involved and do you have time to do that while your lines down. You know all your up and down stream equipment is it going to work properly with that new piece of equipment. A lot of times that’s not the case, it may be a variable act of congress to get that new piece of equipment to work with that old piece of machinery. So if it is obsolete you may really want to think about getting that component repaired because a lot of times you can keep that component repaired. It’s more than likely if you know its repaired by a reputable firm it’s going to have the same amount of warranty on it as a brand new product would, and it’s probably going to be the fraction of the cost of a new component.

So, again repairs can be a great way to reduce maintenance budgets. The cost associated with replacing electronic components especially if you have an event like a lighting strike that can take out a slew of different components on a single drop can prove to be extremely costly. So just remember that, that way if you do have a piece of equipment that goes bad you can replace it with what’s on the shelf as a spare, and then have your bad unit repaired and now that goes back onto the shelf as your spare. So now your spare just cost you a fraction of what it would have cost brand new off the shelf in the first place.

So, Innovative-IDM is one of the premier service organizations out there for repairing industrial electronics. One thing that you can do is visit our website, which is innovativeidm.com/repairs and that will get you into our repair center. Once you’re there, you can look up certain components that we’ve actually repaired in the past and see what it’s going to cost to repair that component without even having to send it to us. If you do send it to us, it’s going to be a free evaluation, typically it takes us 24 – 48 hours to evaluate something for repair. And then, we are going to send you a quote on that and you can elect to have it repaired, returned, or scrapped, it’s your choice. If we do repair something for you, it’s going to give you a new one year warranty on a component from the date of repair. Another thing is, there’s an easy online tool that you can use to actually log in, enter in your email address, and it’ll locate all your information and you can basically just enter in the information about the components you’re going to send in, hit submit, and it will print out a service ticket that you put in the box with the component you’re going to send our repair depot in our Houston facility. The shipping address is right on it, so you don’t even have to wait for a representative from our company to come out and pick that piece of equipment up. Of course, if you are working with one of our field representatives they would be happy to come by and pick the component up, and bring it in for repair if they can fit it in their vehicle.

So, any questions you have on that again you can visit our website or contact one of our representatives and we’d be happy to assist you. After all we are Home of the Legendary Customer Experience.

4 Common Machine Safety Infractions And How To Correct Them

December 9, 2014

Be sure to visit our knowledge Center – http://www.innovativeidm.com/Resources.aspx

Innovative IDM
1625 Wallace Drive, Ste. 110
Carrollton, Texas 75006
Call: 877-906-2100

Hi I’m Lonnie Muse with Innovative IDM. I’ve been in plants for over 30 years, there’s a lot of things that happen in a plant that you just would not believe, you will see a lot of people that’s missing a finger for instance, and how did that happen? You see there are people who just don’t pay attention, but there are about 4 things that we are going to talk about that will help you reduce some of those injuries.
Number one: a lot of people don’t pay attention to pinch points on machines where I can get close and get my clothes or my fingers or my toes into a gear, a shear or anything else along that way. We need guarding on that. Guarding can come in the form of fencing, something to block people from getting to that point, or light curtains, or other opportunities for it to stop the machine so those pinch points won’t happen. We’ve got to pay attention to what’s around the machine so that it doesn’t hurt people, because we know that they are not going to pay attention. To give you an example, in a foundry where we were pouring aluminum into a mold, here’s a big vat with several thousand degrees of molten aluminum. Our robot dipped into the vat, pulled out the aluminum and headed down the line to a mold. One of the operators came out in front of the robot as it was running down the line, everybody’s screaming at him to get out of the way and he said well it will see me. Robots don’t have eyes. And he was lucky that the molten aluminum didn’t hit him because he wouldn’t have any eyes either at the end of that. People don’t pay attention, so we have to help and protect them.
In the rules today, machines are not required to have all the guarding and safety features necessary in the United States made by the manufactures and there are plenty that don’t. So, it’s up to the user to make sure their machines are guarded well and don’t hurt anyone and that’s by OSHAs standards.
Another issue is when you do get something close like an E stop and it doesn’t necessarily work, it doesn’t shut the machine down. It might stop, but does it stop in time? So E stops are important. Are they within reach where the operators are, are there pull switches where the operator can get a hold of them or someone close by where the material is that will stop the machine very quickly so they don’t get hurt. That’s one other place where a lot of safety is lacking.
The other is in protective equipment. On the electrical side what I’m talking about is PPE, Personal Protect Equipment. Face shields, nomex coveralls that won’t burn. If we look at NFPA70E, that’s arc flash, open up the panel and there’s an arc flash – if you’re not protected you will be awfully sorry you didn’t put something on to protect you that’s supplied by the owner of the company that the person works for. So protective equipment, glasses, ear plugs, all sorts of protection equipment. There’s electrical protection too. For instance, ground fault isolators in the panels. If you’re missing a ground and don’t have a ground fault, you could get people shocked.
The last one is really more of the management opportunities you have by properly reporting the incidences you have. OSHA requires that report. If you’re not following the OSHA rules then when the inspector comes in, for whatever reason, you could be in a little bit of trouble.
So, to recap there’s a lot of pinch points there not guarded, there’s stopping, E stops and pull stops that aren’t happening, don’t have the right equipment or there’s electrical equipment or there’s personal protection equipment, and we’re not reporting well.
If you need more information, go to our website at innovativeidm.com and look for safety. After all were Home of the Legendary Customer Experience.

How To Choose A Field Service Organization

November 4, 2014

Be sure to visit our knowledge Center – http://www.innovativeidm.com/Resources.aspx

Innovative IDM
1625 Wallace Drive, Ste. 110
Carrollton, Texas 75006
Call: 877-906-2100

Hello I’m gene gray, buzz and I were sitting around here today at the intergalactic headquarters of innovative and we were talking about a field service organization. And we were thinking, we’ve got a pretty good one, but what’s important to our customers when they choose who to partner with, and more importantly to those customers who haven’t yet picked a field service organization.

Now are you a company that has an automated production facility, you know a factory that’s got equipment like conveyors, robots, different machines that spin around, go back and forth, maybe make paper, steel, who knows. I’ve been at this since 1989 one thing that I found is that regardless of the type of factory that you have when the plant breaks down everybody gets focused, its amazing. It doesn’t matter whether your maintenance, you’re in purchasing, plant management, the focus is to get the plant back up and running, and it makes sense. That sense of urgency needs to be translated and in order for you to pick a good field services organization to come out and help you if you need help you know that hired gun, well they have to have the experience and that staff that understand that sense of urgency.

Now those hired guns, those are the cowboys you know, they love to ride in, the machine is broke down, they’ve got people looking at them, several guys in shirts, some guys in ties, you know staring at their back working on the machine, its high stress, they fix the machine, and they ride out of town they take great satisfaction out of that. These cowboys, one of the things they like is “hey there’s another American factory back in production.”

Now Innovative IDM has been in the field service business since 1971 it’s that experience, it’s the staff that’s been at it for a long time, it’s our culture that helps us understand the sense of urgency, that when you break down that’s the most important thing in the world to you and us. It’s our job to help you get back up and running. We are available 24/7 365. Our field service staff have decades of experience, we continue to bring in new field service technicians right out of school so that we can train and bring up the new generation of field service technicians in this industry, we team them up with field service people who have been in this for 20, some 30 years. So whether you’ve got a machine that’s broke down, or you’ve got a big project that’s coming up where you need a bunch of people to come in, in a controlled shutdown and help you conquer a big project give us a call.

And while we take the time to put together a field service organization like this, top notch, great reputation, just ask for our references. How do we do that? How do we do that buzz? Well why it’s Innovative, home of the legendary customer experience.

The Advantages Of Using Linear Servo Motors

October 28, 2014

Be sure to visit our knowledge Center – http://www.innovativeidm.com/Resources.aspx

Innovative IDM
1625 Wallace Drive, Ste. 110
Carrollton, Texas 75006
Call: 877-906-2100

Hi, my name is Jack Marsh with innovative IDM. Today I’d like to talk a little bit about the advantages of linear servo motors. A lot of people have never even heard of a linear motor and don’t know that that is. Well a linear motor is the same thing as a rotary motor that’s cut and then rolled. There’s as many types of linear motors as there are rotary motors. The physics are the same just the mechanical arrangement of the parts are a little different.
For example linear motors we probably experience multiple times every day I your life if you look at audio speakers the motor that moves the speaker back and forth and generates vibrations is a linear motor. Just a different kind of linear motor than is typically used in industrial applications.
For example if you take this rotary motor, slice it, and unroll it, you’re going to have windings on a part that can move back and forth over the top of a piece of steel that has magnets on it. That is a direct drive thrust producing device that eliminates all the mechanical components in the drive train that would ordinarily take this spinning motor shaft and translate that into linear motion and linear force.
By eliminating all those mechanical components, you eliminate all the wear in the drive train, the back lash, inaccuracies, all the things that degrade the performance of your positioning system
So if you need micron level precision, extremely low friction motion, very high accuracy and reliability, or very high accelerations and velocities, a linear motor might be the perfect solution for you. What you don’t get is the mechanical advantage of say a gear box that you could put on the end of a rotary motor, to multiply the torque output of the motor. So until someone invents the linear equivalent of that, maybe a lever box, we are stuck with the direct drive nature of the linear motor, and if you need more force the cost goes up because you have to buy a larger motor, you can’t put a mechanical advantage device on it. But with that comes all of the advantages of speed and precision a linear motor can provide.
If you’d like to know more please visit our website at innovativeidm.com and remember Innovative IDM is the home of the legendary customer experience.

How To Understand Variable and Constant Torque Applications

October 21, 2014

Be sure to visit our knowledge Center – http://www.innovativeidm.com/Resources.aspx

Innovative IDM
1625 Wallace Drive, Ste. 110
Carrollton, Texas 75006
Call: 877-906-2100

Hi Adam Ring with Innovative IDM. Now a lot of people often wonder what’s the difference between constant torque and variable torque applications in relationship with variable frequency drives. Well it’s really simple, if you think about as the speed varies for a given application if the torque remains the same, regardless of the speed then that’s considered a constant torque. An example of that might be a conveyor. If a conveyor is running really, really slow, you’ve got a given torque with a given load, as long as that load remains the same if you speed it up it still requires the same amount of torque to move it.
With a variable torque application the torque actually varies with the speed so for example a fan or a pump. Takes a very, very little torque to turn a fan at a very low speed. But as that fan starts to speed up and its pushing more air, then it requires more and more torque to push that load and so we call that variable torque. Now typically when we’re talking about sizing a VFD. They’re designed for a given amount of overload capacity in order to start a load, and so typically for a constant torque application, because it got the full demand of torque right at the start up they’ll give you 150% of overload capacity for 60 seconds. With a variable torque since when you start there’s very little torque requirement we only require 120% overload capacity for 60 seconds.
So if you’d like to learn more information about variable torque and constant torque applications or other questions about variable frequency drives please give us a call or look us up at innovativeidm.com were the home of the legendary customer experience

Jon McPherson joins Houston Field Service Team

September 17, 2014

Please join Buzz in welcoming Jon McPherson to the Innovative-IDM Houston Field Service Team! Jon has been previously employed as an Automation/Industrial Electronics-Electrical Technician with the Kellogg’s Corporation and an Engineering Technician w/Paradigm Consultants. He has an excellent background w/SCADA systems, Allen Bradley, Siemens PLCs, various electronic, pneumatic, and hydraulic controls systems. Jon has attended Texas Tech University, Houston Community College, and he is a member of the American Society of Certified Engineering Technicians.

Jon McPherson joins Innovative-IDM