Posted tagged ‘field service’

How to Start a Preventive Maintenance Program

June 15, 2015

How to Start a Preventive Maintenance ProgramStarting a Preventive Maintenance Program isn’t easy….or is it? While taking a proactive approach to your maintenance makes sense on paper, putting the practice to work takes some planning and implementation. That’s why many industrial plants outsource their Preventive Maintenance Programs.

But a do-it-yourself PMP can work, too. With budgets tight and repair teams stretched thin, it can take some patience before a PMP bears any fruit. But patience is a virtue that often is rewarded.

Most factory maintenance teams spend time stamping out repairs and drowning in an endless sea of repair and parts availability problems. Getting ahead of the problems seems impossible — but it’s not.

Any size team can implement a Preventive Maintenance Program of some type. Research indicates that up to 70 percent of all equipment failures are traced back to a lack of regular maintenance. Considering this, the benefits of employing a PMP are paramount if you want to achieve optimum performance from your equipment with minimal cost.

It’s easiest to start with one system and form the foundation of your PMP from there. Choosing the most vital system to your operation, commonly the HVAC, makes the most sense and will provide automatic relief to your maintenance team by removing the heaviest stress load.

To facilitate the transition to a Preventive Maintenance Program, try assigning a small task force to handle any immediate repairs while the remaining group continues to build the momentum of the PMP. As you begin to focus on proactive maintenance instead of reactive maintenance, the workload will gradually begin to lighten and you’ll be able to allocate more personnel to preventive maintenance.

As systems are consistently maintained instead of repaired until they fail again, repair personnel will have fewer surprises to deal with and will focus their efforts on continuing the PMP push. The systems will also operate more efficiently, increasing performance, lifespan and lowering energy costs by up to 50 percent. This where using an outsourced field service company can really pay off.

Conquering the facility’s largest systems first will bring the greatest benefit. Research supports the 80/20 maintenance rule: 80 percent of a facility’s problems are caused by 20 percent of the machines.

Once the emergency workload is reduced drastically, maintenance can become a scheduled event instead of a surprise. It’s less likely you’ll be backed into a corner with a must-have expensive repair. You’ll have time to negotiate a fairer price with outsourced repair contractors backed by the confidence of your stable facility.

The endgame is eventually to have 90 percent of your work orders generated by scheduled equipment inspections. Overall, preventive maintenance should eventually encompass about 30 percent of your total maintenance workload.

Having an easy, scheduled facility to maintain should help you attract and retain quality repairmen who will be more than eager to operate on a schedule instead of in a race. Once all the planning and implementation is done, your repairmen will be thankful, you’ll be thankful and your plant’s maintenance spending should be spread out more orderly instead of spikes and valleys.  — Robert Dominguez

How To Understand Variable and Constant Torque Applications

October 21, 2014

Be sure to visit our knowledge Center – http://www.innovativeidm.com/Resources.aspx

Innovative IDM
1625 Wallace Drive, Ste. 110
Carrollton, Texas 75006
Call: 877-906-2100

Hi Adam Ring with Innovative IDM. Now a lot of people often wonder what’s the difference between constant torque and variable torque applications in relationship with variable frequency drives. Well it’s really simple, if you think about as the speed varies for a given application if the torque remains the same, regardless of the speed then that’s considered a constant torque. An example of that might be a conveyor. If a conveyor is running really, really slow, you’ve got a given torque with a given load, as long as that load remains the same if you speed it up it still requires the same amount of torque to move it.
With a variable torque application the torque actually varies with the speed so for example a fan or a pump. Takes a very, very little torque to turn a fan at a very low speed. But as that fan starts to speed up and its pushing more air, then it requires more and more torque to push that load and so we call that variable torque. Now typically when we’re talking about sizing a VFD. They’re designed for a given amount of overload capacity in order to start a load, and so typically for a constant torque application, because it got the full demand of torque right at the start up they’ll give you 150% of overload capacity for 60 seconds. With a variable torque since when you start there’s very little torque requirement we only require 120% overload capacity for 60 seconds.
So if you’d like to learn more information about variable torque and constant torque applications or other questions about variable frequency drives please give us a call or look us up at innovativeidm.com were the home of the legendary customer experience

How to Choose the Correct Acuator

October 7, 2014

Hi I’m Adam Ring with Innovative IDM. Wanted to share a couple of ideas of things to consider when selecting an actuator for industrial automation.
First thing to consider is what is the speed requirement that you need to be able to move at, also what kind of acceleration do you need, is it really, really slow, is it really, really, fast, 5 gs, what kind of thrust is gonna be required, how much force are you going to have to push with or pull with, what is your overall travel you’re gonna need the distance from your furthest most retracted point to your most extended point. What kind of accuracy and repeatability do you need or is that even important for your application. These are just some of the basics that might steer you one direction or another.
As you can see here I have an example of a screw drive linear actuator, then I also have an example of a belt drive rod less actuator. This one from a speed standpoint brings you up to about 200 inches per second, whereas the screw is gonna be typically in more of the 20 – 50 inches per second range. From an acceleration standpoint we can get you say up to 1G. If you Really, Really need some fast acceleration you might consider a linear motor actuator that gets you up to basically 5gs of acceleration. So depending on what you need, the speed, the acceleration, the thrust, the travel, and the accuracy and repeatability, are things to consider when selecting an actuator.
If you have a need for an actuator or would like to learn more please visit innovativeidm.com after all were the home of the legendary customer experience.

Contract Manufacturing from Innovative-IDM: Electrical Control Panels, 508A, Pneumatic Assemblies

September 23, 2014

For more information, visit http://www.innovativeidm.com/

Do you need Electrical Control Panels, 508A, Kitting, Pneumatic Assemblies, Aluminum Extrusion work stations and assemblies? Have you run out of time and/or expertise and need help? Innovative-IDM contract manufacturing is a UL508A control panel shop among many other things. Adam Ring tells the story.

Jon McPherson joins Houston Field Service Team

September 17, 2014

Please join Buzz in welcoming Jon McPherson to the Innovative-IDM Houston Field Service Team! Jon has been previously employed as an Automation/Industrial Electronics-Electrical Technician with the Kellogg’s Corporation and an Engineering Technician w/Paradigm Consultants. He has an excellent background w/SCADA systems, Allen Bradley, Siemens PLCs, various electronic, pneumatic, and hydraulic controls systems. Jon has attended Texas Tech University, Houston Community College, and he is a member of the American Society of Certified Engineering Technicians.

Jon McPherson joins Innovative-IDM

 

Innovative-IDM DFW Facility Tour: Multiple Ways to Help Your Manufacturing Facility

September 16, 2014

 

If you are an engineer or maintenance professional in an industrial manufacturing setting, Innovative-IDM has an entire facility of services and products that can help you, including 24-hour field service technicians.

We have a presence in Houston, DFW, Austin, San Antonio, Tulsa, OKC, Little Rock, Memphis, Baton Rouge, Mobile and other areas. Here is a quick tour of our DFW location.

If you’d like further information about our services, please go tohttp://InnovativeIDM.com and click on the knowledge center.

After all, Innovative IDM is the home of the legendary customer

5 Reasons You Need An Industrial Preventive Maintenance Plan

August 26, 2014

 

Hi, I’m Lonnie Muse with Innovative IDM in a perfect world things work all the time, they never break, you never have problems.

Unfortunately, you and I are not in a perfect world. Whether it be our car, washing machine or home air conditioning, our kids bike or a plant; things are going to break. What we want to do is catch it before it breaks.

Like our car for instance; you change the oil on a regular basis, you change the tires on a regular basis. That’s so you don’t have the issue of a flat tire when you least expect it.

Murphy will strike every single time. The same effects happen in a plant. You have machines that run 24/7 sometimes and if we don’t have maintenance on those machines they will break.

One of the reasons to have a maintenance program is its cost-effective. That’s also the thing that keeps it from happening. Cost seems to be an issue.

In my experience cost has never been an issue when the machines broke. But it’s always an issue when the machine is running.

So, we have to take those factors into consideration. Studies show its more cost effective to do preventive or predictive or maintenance on a machine to improve its long-term reliability.

Improve its long-term reliability, you catch problems before they actually happen. The way to do that and catching the problem is do visual checks. To do air tests to make sure the flow of air coming in and out of panels is correct and the heat is being dissipated.

Because that’s one of the killers for a lot of machines. We’re doing temperature checks again to check the heat. Check voltages on things that change over time.

By doing this you reduce the risk of the machine going down. If you reduce the risk, you reduce the cost.

Because its costly to have a downed machine especially when the production is a hot job for a customer that needs to go out right now and the machine is now down and its going to take time to fix it.

Also, having a maintenance program is flexible allows you to determine when that machine can be offline and for how long. Because murphy strikes and it breaks, you don’t have to choice.

Also this maintenance can help you understand what the spares needed are. Spares management, replace things before they break when they need it and they’re aging or slowing down or not working well is a lot better than when they fail.

We’d like to help with that and your maintenance plan. We’d be happy to come and look at your machines; help you develop one, help you work at one.

Another cost effective thing that you can do is outsource the people that are coming into do the program. We could be those people for you.

For more information just go to InnovativeIDM.com look under field
service, you can also give me a call at our office or one of the field service managers will be happy to talk with you.

After all, we’re the home of the legendary customer experience.

Parker AC10 Micro Drive

June 9, 2014

AC_Drives_-_AC10_Series_kW_Rated_pd

AC10 Micro Drive is a simple, reliable and economical solution to every-day motor control applications requiring speed or torque control within the power range of 0.2kW to 15kW. Having compact dimensions and features normally only associated with higher specification drives, including, sensorless vector mode, output frequency up to 650 Hz, 3 phase 400VAC supplies in all 5 frame sizes and a full 150 % overload at 0.5 Hz for 1 minute, AC10 provides an optimised solution for OEM machine builders looking for a compact, cost-effective drive without compromising on performance.

For more info or to order your Parker AC10 Micro Drive contact Innovative-IDM at 877-906-2100 or email us at info@iidm.com.

The Advantage Of Using A UL508A Shop

April 12, 2014

Hi, Adam Ring here with Innovative IDM. I want to take a few minutes to talk about UL508A which is basically Underwriters Laboratories and it’s a standard for industrial control panel design.

What’s it all about? Basically, the idea is you want to be able to
make sure that your control panel is safe, it uses good design practices, it has circuit protection and make sure that certain steps or precautions are taken to make sure that the thing doesn’t catch on fire when something goes wrong.

At the end of the day, basically you need a supplier who’s UL508 a certified that can make sure all those things are covered and eventually put a sticker inside your control panel that says that it meets all those requirements.

Now, you could go and do this yourself if you like and a lot of people do…

The challenge is you end up basically paying an annual fee and then a quarterly inspection fee and if you’re not really having a demand for a lot of control panels that are you UL508a it ends up being quite expensive for just getting a very little bit of use.

So, one of the things that Innovative IDM can do for you is build UL508a control panels when necessary. We go through all the certifications and pay all the fees so that we can serve customers like you and make sure that you get what you need in a timely manner.

If you’d like to learn more about how Innovative IDM can help you with your UL508a control panel needs, check us out at InnovativeIDM.com after all, we’re the home of the legendary customer experience.

Be sure to visit our knowledge Center – http://www.innovativeidm.com/Resources.aspx

Innovative IDM
1625 Wallace Drive, Ste. 110
Carrollton, Texas 75006
Call: 877-906-2100

 

The Power of Google and Legendary Customer Service

January 22, 2014

Last month I get a call from a potential customer at 7 pm on a Sunday night asking if we did Field Service repairs.

As I talked with the potential customer I could tell that they were really in a bind over a piece of equipment being down. I told him that we did and asked about their situation and was told that this piece of equipment is the only one in North America capable of producing this certain part for a particular automobile and that it was an injection molding machine.

As we talked, I was told the plant was located in Dayton, Tenn., which is outside of our service area. The potential customer said he had tried everyone he knew and no one was available so he searched online for “Field Service” and we showed up.  I told him we would get back with him shortly.  And I made a few calls and our account rep, Memphis Mike Moore, said that he would talk to them.

I started gathering my tools and laptop when Mike called and said the customer wanted me there ASAP.  After an 8-hour drive I showed up at 3:30 am and we started looking at the machine and by 5 am had determined that it was not electrical and was asked if I could help troubleshoot the hydraulic system.  So 9 days and 156 hours later the machine was running and the customer was extremely happy.

— Dave Oliver