Posted tagged ‘customer support’

5 Ways Temperature Controllers Help Industrial Automation

January 28, 2015

Hi, my name is Andy Lewis with Innovative-IDM, and today I’d like to talk to you about that dime-a-dozen controller located in your plant that is often overlooked, and generally serves its purpose day in and day out. Although they may break down occasionally, I want to make sure that you’re choosing the right temperature controller for the right application.

There are four categories of temperature controllers. There’s the general purpose, the economy, a modular version and the PLC version. All of these have features, benefits and advantages. For the most part, they are all going to have a basic alarm system. Some of them are going to have a more advanced PID-Loop, ramp, soak, temperature changes. And, for the most part, whenever it comes down to the alarms that they put out or the amount of thermo-regulators that they can input within their own controller, the number increases.

General purpose controllers meet a wide range of applications; generally needs for the food processing industry, packaging, extruders, semi-conductors, etc. They’re around there, they’re a dime-a-dozen, you see them all the time.

Next up, is more the economy type and they are relatively simple in function. They don’t have all the bells and whistles that all the other ones are going to have. They are basically going to be able to tell you “Hey! My temperature is this, I need to be at this level, and I’m going to get to this level over this amount of time.” That’s it.

Next, is a modular type, which allows you to have increased capability or decreased capability based upon changes in the application, changes in the product, etc. It all comes down to how many thermo-regulators and controllers you use in conjunction with each other.

Finally, is the PLC version, which is the most advanced version and has the PID instruction in it. Basically, what it means is that it’s very advanced in the way it controls, how tightly it controls the temperature, how quickly it raises it, how quickly it lowers it, etc. That’s whenever the application has a very crucial temperature that can’t go above or below say one or two percent.

I hope this set of categories for the temperature controllers helps you out. If you need any more information, please go to our Knowledge Center at innovativeidm.com and once again, my name is Andy Lewis. Remember, Innovative-IDM is Home of the Legendary Customer Experience.

4 Common Machine Safety Infractions And How To Correct Them

December 9, 2014

Be sure to visit our knowledge Center – http://www.innovativeidm.com/Resources.aspx

Innovative IDM
1625 Wallace Drive, Ste. 110
Carrollton, Texas 75006
Call: 877-906-2100

Hi I’m Lonnie Muse with Innovative IDM. I’ve been in plants for over 30 years, there’s a lot of things that happen in a plant that you just would not believe, you will see a lot of people that’s missing a finger for instance, and how did that happen? You see there are people who just don’t pay attention, but there are about 4 things that we are going to talk about that will help you reduce some of those injuries.
Number one: a lot of people don’t pay attention to pinch points on machines where I can get close and get my clothes or my fingers or my toes into a gear, a shear or anything else along that way. We need guarding on that. Guarding can come in the form of fencing, something to block people from getting to that point, or light curtains, or other opportunities for it to stop the machine so those pinch points won’t happen. We’ve got to pay attention to what’s around the machine so that it doesn’t hurt people, because we know that they are not going to pay attention. To give you an example, in a foundry where we were pouring aluminum into a mold, here’s a big vat with several thousand degrees of molten aluminum. Our robot dipped into the vat, pulled out the aluminum and headed down the line to a mold. One of the operators came out in front of the robot as it was running down the line, everybody’s screaming at him to get out of the way and he said well it will see me. Robots don’t have eyes. And he was lucky that the molten aluminum didn’t hit him because he wouldn’t have any eyes either at the end of that. People don’t pay attention, so we have to help and protect them.
In the rules today, machines are not required to have all the guarding and safety features necessary in the United States made by the manufactures and there are plenty that don’t. So, it’s up to the user to make sure their machines are guarded well and don’t hurt anyone and that’s by OSHAs standards.
Another issue is when you do get something close like an E stop and it doesn’t necessarily work, it doesn’t shut the machine down. It might stop, but does it stop in time? So E stops are important. Are they within reach where the operators are, are there pull switches where the operator can get a hold of them or someone close by where the material is that will stop the machine very quickly so they don’t get hurt. That’s one other place where a lot of safety is lacking.
The other is in protective equipment. On the electrical side what I’m talking about is PPE, Personal Protect Equipment. Face shields, nomex coveralls that won’t burn. If we look at NFPA70E, that’s arc flash, open up the panel and there’s an arc flash – if you’re not protected you will be awfully sorry you didn’t put something on to protect you that’s supplied by the owner of the company that the person works for. So protective equipment, glasses, ear plugs, all sorts of protection equipment. There’s electrical protection too. For instance, ground fault isolators in the panels. If you’re missing a ground and don’t have a ground fault, you could get people shocked.
The last one is really more of the management opportunities you have by properly reporting the incidences you have. OSHA requires that report. If you’re not following the OSHA rules then when the inspector comes in, for whatever reason, you could be in a little bit of trouble.
So, to recap there’s a lot of pinch points there not guarded, there’s stopping, E stops and pull stops that aren’t happening, don’t have the right equipment or there’s electrical equipment or there’s personal protection equipment, and we’re not reporting well.
If you need more information, go to our website at innovativeidm.com and look for safety. After all were Home of the Legendary Customer Experience.

Buzz Welcomes Antoinette Anderson to Innovative-IDM

October 10, 2014

Please join Buzz in welcoming Antoinette Anderson to our Customer Service team as a Data Entry Specialist in the Carrollton office. Antoinette just recently moved to Texas from Champaign, Illinois where she previously worked at The Warranty Group. She grew up in Chicago and Champaign, Illinois. Antoinette loves reading, writing poetry, and hanging out with her family in her spare time. We look forward to watching her grow with Innovative-IDM and know she will provide Legendary Customer Service! We are excited to have Antoinette as part of our Customer Service team!

Antoinette Anderson joins Innovative-IDM

5 Reasons You Need An Industrial Preventive Maintenance Plan

August 26, 2014

 

Hi, I’m Lonnie Muse with Innovative IDM in a perfect world things work all the time, they never break, you never have problems.

Unfortunately, you and I are not in a perfect world. Whether it be our car, washing machine or home air conditioning, our kids bike or a plant; things are going to break. What we want to do is catch it before it breaks.

Like our car for instance; you change the oil on a regular basis, you change the tires on a regular basis. That’s so you don’t have the issue of a flat tire when you least expect it.

Murphy will strike every single time. The same effects happen in a plant. You have machines that run 24/7 sometimes and if we don’t have maintenance on those machines they will break.

One of the reasons to have a maintenance program is its cost-effective. That’s also the thing that keeps it from happening. Cost seems to be an issue.

In my experience cost has never been an issue when the machines broke. But it’s always an issue when the machine is running.

So, we have to take those factors into consideration. Studies show its more cost effective to do preventive or predictive or maintenance on a machine to improve its long-term reliability.

Improve its long-term reliability, you catch problems before they actually happen. The way to do that and catching the problem is do visual checks. To do air tests to make sure the flow of air coming in and out of panels is correct and the heat is being dissipated.

Because that’s one of the killers for a lot of machines. We’re doing temperature checks again to check the heat. Check voltages on things that change over time.

By doing this you reduce the risk of the machine going down. If you reduce the risk, you reduce the cost.

Because its costly to have a downed machine especially when the production is a hot job for a customer that needs to go out right now and the machine is now down and its going to take time to fix it.

Also, having a maintenance program is flexible allows you to determine when that machine can be offline and for how long. Because murphy strikes and it breaks, you don’t have to choice.

Also this maintenance can help you understand what the spares needed are. Spares management, replace things before they break when they need it and they’re aging or slowing down or not working well is a lot better than when they fail.

We’d like to help with that and your maintenance plan. We’d be happy to come and look at your machines; help you develop one, help you work at one.

Another cost effective thing that you can do is outsource the people that are coming into do the program. We could be those people for you.

For more information just go to InnovativeIDM.com look under field
service, you can also give me a call at our office or one of the field service managers will be happy to talk with you.

After all, we’re the home of the legendary customer experience.

OKC Omron Machine Safeguarding Training in Action

July 24, 2014

Innovative-IDM customers in Oklahoma City enjoyed Machine Safeguarding training today with trainer Sean Guillory of Omron Automation and Safety. Attendees learned about how to identify machine hazards, machine hazard risk assessment, machine guarding techniques and technologies and much more.

Next up for Oklahoma is SMC Basic and Electro Pneumatics training in Tulsa on August 13 & 14. Call 214.574.9500 or email marketing@iidm.com to sign up today!

Omron Machine Safeguarding training in Oklahoma City July 2014 STI3_OKCJuly2014

 

Here We Go Again: Another Happy Customer

June 16, 2014

Well, well, well…..yet another happy customer. This time, the customer had wired the AC drive incorrectly. Our Houston-based engineer, Steve Lyons, trouble shot this one. Written testimonials are tough to come by, yet Innovative-IDM gets more than its fair share of customer comments. We’re not perfect. But with our focus on exceeding our customers’ expectations, we’re bound to hit a home run every now and then.

From: Michael C.
Sent: Monday, June 16, 2014 5:41 AM
To: Steve Lyons
Cc: Chad Kauffman; Andy Lewis; Gene Gray
Subject: Thank you, Thank you, Thank you

Steve,

I want to thank you and tell you, you are an amazing engineer, strategic partner and a good friend.

Thank you for all your time, patient and personal concern working with me on this issue.  I  owe you a great deal of gratitude and thanks, professionally and personally.

You were spot on target it was one of three issues –  wiring, relay or drive.   This is another great example of always going for the drive as the problem, and not following the first most important pathway – Wiring.  We checked the first half of the path to the drive, but assumed the motor lead wiring was right. But, as we now know the leads to the motor we not connected and it was the problem we caused.

This would be a great story of how IIDM helps and supports your customers 24/7 and the problem was solved, and most important the customer was the problem. I admit it.  Never assume the customer hooks up the equipment correct. We tested each drive twice then assembled the system, but never did a final complete system run test.  That was the flaw.  Or we did not do a Final system wiring check, by even a simple ohm meter.

You might mention that to your sales and tech team. It was a problem we caused and you again were the great strategic partner to help and support us while we searched for the problem.

Remember I told you the problem is a simple one, we just need to locate it and you enabled me to find it. And  I don’t need to go to Russia to solve the problem.  We did it together with your talent, iPhone technology and emails.

Thanks again,

Michael C. – President

Building a Warehouse

January 21, 2014

Our Oklahoma customers have been very excited about our new warehouse location opening up in Tulsa, but building our warehouse from scratch was no easy task. We started with little more than a few thousand square feet of empty space (that is a lot of floor to mop) when I arrived in October, and it was pretty dirty. I had my work cut out for me.

The first step was to clean up the mess the contractors made; but after about a week of late nights cleaning up and mopping the warehouse space, we were ready to get some shelves.

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Some assembly required, of course.

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It was dangerous work, too. I’m talking crab fishing in the Arctic circle dangerous.

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But after some long hours, a little pain, and a dash of sweat, it all came together and now we have a LEGENDARY new stocking location for our Oklahoma customers. JP, Matt, Trevor, Vitalii, and I couldn’t be more excited.

— Lorne Henderson

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