Archive for the ‘field service’ category

How to Start a Preventive Maintenance Program

June 15, 2015

How to Start a Preventive Maintenance ProgramStarting a Preventive Maintenance Program isn’t easy….or is it? While taking a proactive approach to your maintenance makes sense on paper, putting the practice to work takes some planning and implementation. That’s why many industrial plants outsource their Preventive Maintenance Programs.

But a do-it-yourself PMP can work, too. With budgets tight and repair teams stretched thin, it can take some patience before a PMP bears any fruit. But patience is a virtue that often is rewarded.

Most factory maintenance teams spend time stamping out repairs and drowning in an endless sea of repair and parts availability problems. Getting ahead of the problems seems impossible — but it’s not.

Any size team can implement a Preventive Maintenance Program of some type. Research indicates that up to 70 percent of all equipment failures are traced back to a lack of regular maintenance. Considering this, the benefits of employing a PMP are paramount if you want to achieve optimum performance from your equipment with minimal cost.

It’s easiest to start with one system and form the foundation of your PMP from there. Choosing the most vital system to your operation, commonly the HVAC, makes the most sense and will provide automatic relief to your maintenance team by removing the heaviest stress load.

To facilitate the transition to a Preventive Maintenance Program, try assigning a small task force to handle any immediate repairs while the remaining group continues to build the momentum of the PMP. As you begin to focus on proactive maintenance instead of reactive maintenance, the workload will gradually begin to lighten and you’ll be able to allocate more personnel to preventive maintenance.

As systems are consistently maintained instead of repaired until they fail again, repair personnel will have fewer surprises to deal with and will focus their efforts on continuing the PMP push. The systems will also operate more efficiently, increasing performance, lifespan and lowering energy costs by up to 50 percent. This where using an outsourced field service company can really pay off.

Conquering the facility’s largest systems first will bring the greatest benefit. Research supports the 80/20 maintenance rule: 80 percent of a facility’s problems are caused by 20 percent of the machines.

Once the emergency workload is reduced drastically, maintenance can become a scheduled event instead of a surprise. It’s less likely you’ll be backed into a corner with a must-have expensive repair. You’ll have time to negotiate a fairer price with outsourced repair contractors backed by the confidence of your stable facility.

The endgame is eventually to have 90 percent of your work orders generated by scheduled equipment inspections. Overall, preventive maintenance should eventually encompass about 30 percent of your total maintenance workload.

Having an easy, scheduled facility to maintain should help you attract and retain quality repairmen who will be more than eager to operate on a schedule instead of in a race. Once all the planning and implementation is done, your repairmen will be thankful, you’ll be thankful and your plant’s maintenance spending should be spread out more orderly instead of spikes and valleys.  — Robert Dominguez

Yaskawa F7 Interesting Problem I’ve Never Seen

February 6, 2015

As one of Innovative-IDM’s Houston-area field service technicians, I was called out to look at a lathe.

The customer complained that the lube pump wasn’t working. It actually was. But we started the machine and ramped it up, it sounded like the gears were going to grind out of the machine and the DB resistors started smoking. The customer indicated it was probably normal, due to low load and gear selection…I took the opposite view (there is something seriously wrong here) and convinced him to pull the belts. The motor continued to cog (and the DB started to smoke again) at about 1/4 speed even uncoupled.

The motor megged and ohmed normal.

The Yaskawa F7 4045 drive was running in Open loop vector.

I disconnected the DB Unit (it statically checked fine). The cogging continued and the drive OV tripped.

I saved the parameters and switched the drive to V/Hz. The cogging decreased dramatically (however the machine still started to vibrate. No OV trip.) The output waveform looked fairly normal phase to phase, and normal phase to+/- busses.

At about 15hz the DC buss started to get a 100VAC sign wave riding on top of it at ~ 11Hz and linearly increased to 12Hz as the drive was speed up to 20hz, above that the ripple disappeared. The machine vibration also followed starting at 15Hz and disappearing at 20 Hz.

I broke out my Fluke Scope current clamp on, and found the output current waveform to be a normal sine wave below 15hz and above 20Hz.

Between 15 and 20Hz however the Current waveform (on all 3 legs) appears to be the summation of 2 similarly sized ac waveforms.

I discussing the situation with one of our engineers, Steve Lyons, and he suggested that the issue could be the result of the motors rotor wobbling, changing the air gap.

I informed the customer that I’m leaning towards a motor issue ~ 85/15 and that the only way to be certain is to hook up the drive to a test motor.

We will do so at a later date as the customer will bring out his spare motor while he fixes the gearing (he found several issues during a visual inspection preformed while I was dinking with the drive). The machine will be down for a month or so.

I have included a pdf of the “Normal” current waveform VS the “Distorted” current waveform.

I’ve never seen this before … if any one has any ideas I’m open for suggestions, experiences, anecdotes…what ever you’ve got.  – DF

Yaskawa V7 data

Yaskawa V7 Trouble Shooting Data

Jon McPherson joins Houston Field Service Team

September 17, 2014

Please join Buzz in welcoming Jon McPherson to the Innovative-IDM Houston Field Service Team! Jon has been previously employed as an Automation/Industrial Electronics-Electrical Technician with the Kellogg’s Corporation and an Engineering Technician w/Paradigm Consultants. He has an excellent background w/SCADA systems, Allen Bradley, Siemens PLCs, various electronic, pneumatic, and hydraulic controls systems. Jon has attended Texas Tech University, Houston Community College, and he is a member of the American Society of Certified Engineering Technicians.

Jon McPherson joins Innovative-IDM

 

5 Reasons You Need An Industrial Preventive Maintenance Plan

August 26, 2014

 

Hi, I’m Lonnie Muse with Innovative IDM in a perfect world things work all the time, they never break, you never have problems.

Unfortunately, you and I are not in a perfect world. Whether it be our car, washing machine or home air conditioning, our kids bike or a plant; things are going to break. What we want to do is catch it before it breaks.

Like our car for instance; you change the oil on a regular basis, you change the tires on a regular basis. That’s so you don’t have the issue of a flat tire when you least expect it.

Murphy will strike every single time. The same effects happen in a plant. You have machines that run 24/7 sometimes and if we don’t have maintenance on those machines they will break.

One of the reasons to have a maintenance program is its cost-effective. That’s also the thing that keeps it from happening. Cost seems to be an issue.

In my experience cost has never been an issue when the machines broke. But it’s always an issue when the machine is running.

So, we have to take those factors into consideration. Studies show its more cost effective to do preventive or predictive or maintenance on a machine to improve its long-term reliability.

Improve its long-term reliability, you catch problems before they actually happen. The way to do that and catching the problem is do visual checks. To do air tests to make sure the flow of air coming in and out of panels is correct and the heat is being dissipated.

Because that’s one of the killers for a lot of machines. We’re doing temperature checks again to check the heat. Check voltages on things that change over time.

By doing this you reduce the risk of the machine going down. If you reduce the risk, you reduce the cost.

Because its costly to have a downed machine especially when the production is a hot job for a customer that needs to go out right now and the machine is now down and its going to take time to fix it.

Also, having a maintenance program is flexible allows you to determine when that machine can be offline and for how long. Because murphy strikes and it breaks, you don’t have to choice.

Also this maintenance can help you understand what the spares needed are. Spares management, replace things before they break when they need it and they’re aging or slowing down or not working well is a lot better than when they fail.

We’d like to help with that and your maintenance plan. We’d be happy to come and look at your machines; help you develop one, help you work at one.

Another cost effective thing that you can do is outsource the people that are coming into do the program. We could be those people for you.

For more information just go to InnovativeIDM.com look under field
service, you can also give me a call at our office or one of the field service managers will be happy to talk with you.

After all, we’re the home of the legendary customer experience.

Setting Up And Auto Tuning A Yaskawa Drive

August 12, 2014

 

For more information visit http://www.innovativeidm.com/

Hi! My name is Jack Marsh with Innovative IDM. Today I would like to talk about how to set up and auto tune a Yaskawa variable frequency drive. Users are often ask me when I am talking to them and visiting them about how do I configure and get this thing running. The manual, as you can see, can be quite large and intimidating, but it’s really a very simple device, that has very complicated uses if you want to make it that way.

The easiest way to start is to get one of these cheat sheets that Yaskawa provides. There is one for the Microdrive family, the V1000, there’s a couple more for the A1000 family because it’s a little higher featured. So there’s more operating modes. But using the cheat sheets, it walks you through how to wire the motor, the three or four simple parameters it wants you to use, and then the actual operation of setting up and auto tuning.

If you want a little more detail, you can always get the quick start guide where there are very simple flow charts you can use. It walks you through, step by step what you need to do to get the drive up and running- very simple. And if you needed to know everything possible about every perimeter there are the big, detailed complicated manuals that will tell you everything you need to know.

If you want to get copies of the cheat sheets, or the manuals, please contact us at Innovative Idm, where anyone you talk to will be able to get you the information, or get you to someone who can. If you want PDF copies, please go to our website at Innovativeidm.com and download whatever you need. And remember, Innovative IDM is the home of the legendary customer experience.

How AC Drives Can Save Money & Improve Your Power Factor

August 5, 2014

 

Hi, my name is Andy with Innovative-IDM. A lot of the time, when I’m out visiting customers, they have a variety of issues. One of the primary ones they have is: money. This money is basically due to, high energy cost from their utility company. And the main reason, this problem is occurring, is because their power factor is low.

Now, whenever we talk about power factor, really, what is it? Technically it is the ratio of the real power flowing to the load, to the apparent power in the circuit. Now, basically, all this is meaning is that, are you efficiently using the power coming in to your plant? Now, a lot of plants, back twenty, thirty, forty years ago were only using DC drives, DC motors, etc.

Now, these machines or these motors, these drives are inherently low on the power factor rating. Generally somewhere between 0 – 0.85 on the power factor rating. Now, An AC drive, for example, is usually between 0.85 and all the way up to 0.96 on the rating. What does this mean? AC drives are more efficient, they are extremely efficient in energy utilization compared to a DC motor or a DC drive.

Now, whenever you have, for example, a motor that’s running across the line with no drive at all, that power factor is directly related to the type of motor that it is, it’s duty cycle, etc. In general terms, putting a drive in front of a motor is always a good decision, because it will, more efficiently control the current traveling through that motor, end case is, savings.

Now, Yaskawa; for example, one of our manufactures of drives, actually provides a free download from our knowledge center at innovative-idm.com. Just click on knowledge center and you’ll find it. This energy savings predictor will allow you to input your motor, nameplate information, your drive name plate information and then, it’ll give you a graphical representation of, on average, what your power factor is, and how much you are capable to save. My suggestion to you is, to speak with your energy provider, as well as your local retrofit provider; Innovative-IDM and talk about how you can increase your power factor, thereby, saving more money.

For more information, go to http://www.innovativeidm.com and remember; Innovative-IDM is the home of the legendary customer experience.

How Do I Retrofit A DC Drive to AC Drive

June 24, 2014

Visit Innovative-IDM’s knowledge center at: http://www.innovativeidm.com/Resources.aspx

For more information Yaskawa Drives and VFDs visit: http://www.innovativeidm.com/Manufacturers/Yaskawa%20VFD.aspx and http://www.innovativeidm.com/Manufacturers/Yaskawa%20Motion.aspx

 

Hi, I’m Adam Ring with Innovative-IDM. The other day I was having lunch and somebody asked me ‘how do you go about converting from a DC drive system to an AC drive system?’ I thought it might be a good idea to make a quick video. Other people might have that same question.

So there’s a few things you want to take a look at. Number one is ‘what’s the speed that your DC motor is running at? Another thing you want to look at is what is the amount of torque that your application requires? Based on those two pieces of information, you can go back and calculate how much horsepower that you need, and then make sure that you replace your DC with an equivalent  AC motor and drive that are going to give you at least that amount of speed, at least that amount of torque, and one of the cool things that happens when you actually switch from a DC to an AC, is with a DC you get constant torque throughout the speed range, and that’s one of the reasons a lot of people apply them is because when you are going really slow you can get a fairly constant torque, all the way up to your max speed.

With AC drive technology today, with a closed look flux vector, you actually get the same kind of performance, all the way down to zero speed. You can have 100% of your motors torque down to zero speed. As far as solving the applications, it’s going to be able to respond very quickly, give you the full torque across the entire speed range, and it’s actually more efficient because of the way that the design works. So you actually at the end of the day get to save some of your current that’s required to do a similar application, which basically translates into cost savings for power.

So if you would like to learn more about how to convert your applications from DC to AC, please visit our knowledge center at Innovativeidm.com. After all, we are the home of the legendary customer experience.