Archive for December 2014

Yaskawa Sigma-5 Servo Amplifier Delivers Highest Performance in the Industry

December 10, 2014

Yaskawa Sigma 5 Servo Ampllifier

The Sigma-5 servo amplifier delivers the highest performance in the industry due its unmatched frequency response, reduced settling times and more precise control. In addition it provides a faster set up, simpler tuning, and vibration suppression. With a wide range of models and options to it can match your individual application requirements.

Features

  • Unprecedented ease-of-use through cutting-edge technology.
    • New tuning-less function means no adjustment needed.
    • Impressive load regulation with strengthened vibration suppression function.
  • Slashed setup time.
    • Setup wizard function and wiring conformation function of engineering tool SigmaWin+ allows easy setup just by watching the monitor.
  • High response characteristics at 1 kHz min.
    • New advanced autotuning.
    • Reduced positioning time through model following control, and smooth machine control enabled by vibration supression function.

Ready to order your SGDV Sigma-5 Servo Amplifier? Call Innovative-IDM at 877.906.2100 or send us an email at info@iidm.com

4 Common Machine Safety Infractions And How To Correct Them

December 9, 2014

Be sure to visit our knowledge Center – http://www.innovativeidm.com/Resources.aspx

Innovative IDM
1625 Wallace Drive, Ste. 110
Carrollton, Texas 75006
Call: 877-906-2100

Hi I’m Lonnie Muse with Innovative IDM. I’ve been in plants for over 30 years, there’s a lot of things that happen in a plant that you just would not believe, you will see a lot of people that’s missing a finger for instance, and how did that happen? You see there are people who just don’t pay attention, but there are about 4 things that we are going to talk about that will help you reduce some of those injuries.
Number one: a lot of people don’t pay attention to pinch points on machines where I can get close and get my clothes or my fingers or my toes into a gear, a shear or anything else along that way. We need guarding on that. Guarding can come in the form of fencing, something to block people from getting to that point, or light curtains, or other opportunities for it to stop the machine so those pinch points won’t happen. We’ve got to pay attention to what’s around the machine so that it doesn’t hurt people, because we know that they are not going to pay attention. To give you an example, in a foundry where we were pouring aluminum into a mold, here’s a big vat with several thousand degrees of molten aluminum. Our robot dipped into the vat, pulled out the aluminum and headed down the line to a mold. One of the operators came out in front of the robot as it was running down the line, everybody’s screaming at him to get out of the way and he said well it will see me. Robots don’t have eyes. And he was lucky that the molten aluminum didn’t hit him because he wouldn’t have any eyes either at the end of that. People don’t pay attention, so we have to help and protect them.
In the rules today, machines are not required to have all the guarding and safety features necessary in the United States made by the manufactures and there are plenty that don’t. So, it’s up to the user to make sure their machines are guarded well and don’t hurt anyone and that’s by OSHAs standards.
Another issue is when you do get something close like an E stop and it doesn’t necessarily work, it doesn’t shut the machine down. It might stop, but does it stop in time? So E stops are important. Are they within reach where the operators are, are there pull switches where the operator can get a hold of them or someone close by where the material is that will stop the machine very quickly so they don’t get hurt. That’s one other place where a lot of safety is lacking.
The other is in protective equipment. On the electrical side what I’m talking about is PPE, Personal Protect Equipment. Face shields, nomex coveralls that won’t burn. If we look at NFPA70E, that’s arc flash, open up the panel and there’s an arc flash – if you’re not protected you will be awfully sorry you didn’t put something on to protect you that’s supplied by the owner of the company that the person works for. So protective equipment, glasses, ear plugs, all sorts of protection equipment. There’s electrical protection too. For instance, ground fault isolators in the panels. If you’re missing a ground and don’t have a ground fault, you could get people shocked.
The last one is really more of the management opportunities you have by properly reporting the incidences you have. OSHA requires that report. If you’re not following the OSHA rules then when the inspector comes in, for whatever reason, you could be in a little bit of trouble.
So, to recap there’s a lot of pinch points there not guarded, there’s stopping, E stops and pull stops that aren’t happening, don’t have the right equipment or there’s electrical equipment or there’s personal protection equipment, and we’re not reporting well.
If you need more information, go to our website at innovativeidm.com and look for safety. After all were Home of the Legendary Customer Experience.

New OSHA Regulations for Reporting Serious Injuries

December 8, 2014

Occupational Safety and Health Administration

Effective January 1, 2015, workplaces under federal OSHA jurisdiction will be required to report all serious work-related injuries within 24 hours of their occurrence.

These include in-patient hospitalizations, amputations or losses of an eye; fatalities will require that OSHA be notified within eight hours.

Read Revised OSHA Rule Requires Employers to Report All Serious Injuries within 24 Hours (September 2014, EHS Today) to learn more about the change, and its intended impact on employers, workers and injury rates.

Prevent serious injuries at your plant with safety equipment from Omron STI. For help with your safety system or to order Omron STI equipment, call Innovative-IDM at 877.906.2100 or email us at info@iidm.om

Ultra-Compact Electric Linear Guide Actuator

December 3, 2014

SMC Ultra-Compact Electric Linear Guide Actuator

The electric actuator market offers many solutions for large or heavy loads. But what if you need something for very light loads? Or perhaps you have tight space restrictions? SMC’s LAT3 integrates a magnetic linear motor, a recirculating ball guide, and a high resolution position sensor in a package the size of a business card! The slim 9mm profile can fit into a tight installation envelope.

Quickly set up to 15 positioning commands with intuitive software
Optical linear encoder with 1.25 μm resolution suitable for automatic gaging
Positioning accuracy as fine as ±5 μm
Capable of carrying a 500g mass and moment loading
Maximum thrust of 6N
Complete package includes actuator, 24VDC controller, and cables, plus software kit with site license

For more information on the LA T3 Card Motor Ultra-Compact Electric Linear Guide Actuator, call Innovative-IDM at 877.906.2100 or email us at info@iidm.com

November LCS Winners!!!

December 2, 2014

It is my honor to announce the winners

of our November LCS Cup……….

Kicking Your Axis!!!

The magical team comprised of Dustin Greene, Lonnie Muse, Steve Falcone, Pepper Hastings, Jennie Buker, Gene Mussell and team captain Gina Arredondo finished the month strong to win this coveted cup.

Kicking Your Axis has won a Team Lunch on the company as well as a Half Day Off for their prize. Looking forward to next month and another win, Gina Arredondo says, “Losing is never an option!”

DSCN0406

Safety Rated vs NonSafety Rated Components

December 2, 2014

Be sure to visit our knowledge Center – http://www.innovativeidm.com/Resources.aspx

Innovative IDM
1625 Wallace Drive, Ste. 110
Carrollton, Texas 75006
Call: 877-906-2100

Hi, my name is Jeff Rogers. Often times I’m asked what the difference is between safety rated and non-safety rated components. There is a really big difference. I often walk into plants and see components all over the place that people are using such as through beam sensors for perimeter guarding that are not safety rated. To not use safety rated components can mean the difference between a law suit, potential injury or death and just a properly functioning safety system. A few things that I wanted to discuss today are a few of the differences between the two, how they can resemble each other and still be completely different, and what is going to make one a better choice than the other.
If you are going to use a component for a safety circuit, when you are thinking safety components that needs to ring in your mind reliability, redundancy, and fail safe. Those are the three main things that should come to mind when thinking about that. Like the example I stated earlier a through beam sensor can be used as a perimeter guard, but if it is not hooked up to a safety monitoring relay for instance if there is a problem with that sensor the circuit may not know. Your machine may keep operating even if someone walks through and someone could potentially get hurt by that piece of equipment. There are also things out there such as programmable safety controllers that exist, as well as just discrete components such as interlocks or safety rope pulls that have certain types of internal components that are used so that it’s reliable, it’s called control reliability. That’s the one thing you always want to make sure. You’ll hear things such as force guided contacts that are important in these types of components it basically means if a contact welds shut it can then be forced open so that the circuit can be broken. Most safety circuits are closed circuits, so in the event of power loss the circuit is broken and everything fails to a stop. If you look at this interlock you can see this is a tongue and groove type interlock. The internals of it you can see if I push on the plunger in here you can see that red piece moves the contacts up and down. They are all mechanically linked together. That is one example. Another thing is this symbol right here which is a circle with an arrow inside of it stands for forced guided contact. That is important to use when picking out safety components.
The things that you really want to remember are the safety regulated components are more expensive, they always will be because of the redundancy that is built in. When it could mean serious injury or death don’t go cheap because if you do it could cost you more in the long run. If you are not sure, there are a lot of grey areas, ask somebody. Don’t leave it to chance. There are professionals out there. You could go to our website at innovative-idm.com and go to our knowledge center. We have white pages that exist and we could come out on site and help you solve those things. We’re not the safety police. We’re not going to report you to OSHA, but we want to help you make better decisions when dealing with safety circuits and know that there is a difference. Using non safety rated components in a safety circuit is never okay. That is all I have for you today. After all we are the home of the Legendary Customer Experience.